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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
syria. this interview recorded on the campus of george mason university in virginia. lasts about half an hour. .. there are there are. .. >> it went through a number of changes. it went from a centralized state of economy to a mixed economy that evolves from central state economy aspects and some market aspects, but not in the manner that actually allowed the market to be efficient at all. >> when did this change occur from centralized next? >> most of these countries, the late developed countries, they underwent a period where they had to actually involve the masses in order to gain support. and legitimacy. when this process, for a variety of reasons began to create problems for the regimes in power, and when external support and pressure for some of these regimes and for some of the directions that were unable at the time moving towards a market economy around the 1980s took place, you saw a lot of these third world regimes, or the global south, begin to move from a central economy to more market oriented economy and the international financial institutions like the imf and the
, marcusreddeker.com. >>> from the 17th annual texas book festival in successen, texas, we discuss the book "syria: the fall of the house oo assad." >> thank you so much foruch for spending part of your afternoony with us here.s i would like to welcome you alle on behalf of the professor and myself. this is afessor l wesonderful s. i'm saying that dispassionately, and we're so happy you're here.r i wanted to introduce the profe professor to you. he is asch to professor of middt history at trinity university it san antonio. professor lesch is a prolific writer writer and thinker about the the middle east and what's happening in the region. it's really a treat tosy a havem here today.he h w he's written his new book n b "syria: the fall of the house ou assad" which i'm hoping you'll m all purchase and get him toill sign. he signed my copy first so he f. has met extensively with met president assad and officials lg between 2004-2011, been in the middle east, studying the middle st east, making connections andeast friendships in the middle east for a quar ater century. the r why that's important is, o
today. the pontiff touched on political themes as well, calling for peace in syria and appealing to italians to embrace the spirit of cooperation in upcoming elections. >> tens of thousands of people showed up in st. peter's square to hear benedict's message, and millions to and in worldwide. >> tens of thousands of people turned out to hear the pope's christmas message. the square erupted in applause as the pontiff stepped out to address the crowd. he revisited one of the themes of his christmas eve message -- the wish for peace in the middle east. turning and i to syria, he called for an end to the conflict -- turning an eye to syria. the pope appealed to those responsible to stop the bloodshed and slaughter of innocent people. he called for dialogue in order to find a political solution to the conflict. the pope then delivered a christmas message in 65 languages. >> remind the world that true happiness lies in their hearts with hope and joy, for the savior has been born for us. >> for many in the audience, hearing the message in their own language was an obvious highlight. the
, secretary panetta, since president obama made a statement about syria and chemical weapons again and secretary clinton did, we understand the red line, but the world this week certainly growing concern about syria's potential use of chemical weapons. can we ask you your view on this, how concerned are you? how imminent are your concerns? should assad believe that his weapons are sheltered and safe from potential response, a potential military action by anyone? >> well, without commenting on the specific intelligence that we have with regards to the chemical weapons, i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned that as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, that the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. the whole world is watching. the whole world's watching very closely. the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be cons qenszs. -- consequences. there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their open people. i'm not going to s
to state conflict, a conflict between israel and jordan, israel and syria and israel and egypt. this became a new conflict that emerged, one between israel and the palestinians. before 1967, you really didn't hear about the palestinians. it's not by accident a year after the war ended in 1968, the p.l.o., under yasser arafat, emerges as this powerful force in the arab world. we have been living with that as well. 1967 war was also inaugurated the strategic relationship between the united states and israel. people forget that israel fought the 1967 war not with american arms but with french weaponry. france was their principal ally. before 1967, one israeli prime minister one time for one hour had visited the white house. it wasn't israel's founder. june 1964. today ariel sharon or any israeli prime minister comes to washington, it's obvious he will march into the white house. that began that very, very close relationship, that cooperation began in the aftermath of 1967, not before that. >> as you acknowledge, one more book on the six-day war. there have been a lot of them. what do you have
until that date occurs. >>trace: investigators say syria could have thousands of chemical agents including cyanide and the deadly nerve gas. 40,000 people have died so far in the syrian civil war. now the fighting has spilled into neighboring lebanon, a nation where tens of thousands of syrians have sought refuge. officials in a northern city reported at least six people have died and more than 50 have been wounded in two days of violence. jonathan hunt is live today at the united nations. the big question is, will president assad stay and fight? will he seek asylum? >>jonathan: the turks and russians, they are saying they are working on what they call "new ideas to bring an end to the ongoing 20--month-old civil war." they have nut given any ideas or details what those ideas might be but it will revolve around whether president assad has decided he going to live and die in syria and die most likely at the hands of the rebels or whether he can be persuaded to say asylum but that has the u.n. secretary-general having misgivings giving a man who has murdered 40,000 of his own peopl
and saying no to bad things, but we need to do more than that gwen: abroad, tensions in syria on the rise. can the u.s. intervene? should we? covering the week -- jackie calmes of "new york times," eamon javers of cnbc, amy walter of abc news, and james kitfield of "national journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live from our nations capitol, this is washington week with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate funding for washington week is provided by -- ♪ >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here. to charlotte a greater path, in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by prudential additional funding is also provided by the annenberg financial. foundation, the corpo
senator mccain will be talking about syria very shortly. do either of you have any thoughts on that? >> i'm coming back >> senators talking about the passage of the russian trade bill, the vote on the floor of the senate a short while ago was 92-4. a look -- the senate continues in session with a vote coming up likely this afternoon, possible vote on the -- we had bep told there was a news conference happening on c-span. >> good afternoon, i'm here with my colleagues from the senate, senator leeber and senator graham and we are deeply disturbed by reports that assad may have weapononized some of his stores of chemical and biological agents and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines an
on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his unusual prescience congressman royce also foreseen many of the developments we witnessed of late in the midd
are speaking only about foreign policy and in particular in a very focused way on syria. i do want to thank those who made this possible and as chairman of the key subcommittee i value the work that you do, each of you do on a range of policies, whether it is the security of our troops in afghanistan, syria which i will focus on but also the work you do to strengthen our policy as it relates to the regime in iran. your team has brought to the forefront carefully thought out and persuasive research and policy positions that have been an outstanding resource for those of us in congress and i am grateful for that help. i know that the theme of this year's forum is, quote, dictators and dissidents:should the west choose sides? quite topical given the events that have played out most recently whether it is the arabs spring, or nascent democratic openings, i would argue the central question maybe is one of process. that question being whether the u.s. the west should support the democratic process such that citizens are able to choose their own leaders. even when the process gives rise to politic
the opportunity to diverse, talk about afghanistan, bahrain, syria, talk about this, that, and so the agenda has to be narrow as a need of focusing on the issue of the principle concern. that's one. that's con accept issue, as far as i can tell was never resolved. when an issue remains unresolved, the status quo revails. i suspect, given the fact the issue of a bilateral conversation is a last ditch effort, likely to remain focused. should it be considered a last ditch effort? i don't think so. you talk about years of decision, the year of that, the year of that. we have more time on this issue. it's a paradoxical one. think about it as not having the time, yet, there's always more time. you know, everybody, so this is in 2008, 2009, somehow this issue seems to have within its urgency a degree of time flexibility. i don't know how to explain that. we have had bilateral discussions before in october 2009, most collectly. if there's a bilateral one to take place, which tends to condition the agenda that's going to be discussed. >> marina, bringing you in on this, ray said we need a sense of modest
of syria eventually. so we have to be very careful. be part of the settlement, with a gap between what people think about the settlement out of court and the jury-ish community and about the reality. maybe you can tell me, do you know what is the actual percentage of settlement of jewish homes occupying land in judea and samaria? sound settlement, what is actual on the ground that she had occupied the lands? anyone? >> is 3%. i wish it was 50, 90 or 100%. but it's not the case. it is vacant. the idea that the jews cannot leave, because we do not have peace i do not accept it. to date israel with arab israelis, 20% in the week. they live like i live, vote like i vote and nobody tell them if you've not lived there, you have to move out. we have to get to the understanding that it's not about the settlement. it's much deeper than that. [inaudible] >> that is the question? i am 41, ma'am. i do not -- and said what you want. did you get peace? what did it get? [inaudible] >> i think my point is very clear that history has told us we cannot wait and we cannot get to a point when people speak
and israel to deal with the ongoing revolutions customer the descent into chaos and syria, the growing divide that is spreading across the arab world and the broader middle east, iran's nuclear weapons program, and the absence of an effort to resolve the israeli-palestinian conflict. these are questions and many others that we will have a chance to discuss this weekend. like me, you, i'd just can now wait to get started then that we have a very special guest tonight to get us started. i am very grateful to him for joining us tonight. we have tried for many years to have him join us at the forum. some of you misremember he was here five years ago before he became the foreign minister. since then, we have not had the pleasure for one reason or another. i am grateful that he is going to start us off today than the y today. the leader of th he is now the number two leader of the party and now the foreign minister in the current government of israel. to interview him tonight and to conduct conversations with him before we have a chance to ask him some questions, we are very grateful to robert sieg
, but his freedom comes at a terrible price. plus, syria coming apart at the seams, extremist groups playing a big role in the up rising. we will discuss how this will effect the united states and our policies there, next. [ male announcer ] red lobster's hitting the streets to tell real people about our new 15 under $15 menu. oh my goodness! oh my gosh, this looks amazing! [ male announcer ] our new maine stays! 15entrees under $15, seafood, chicken and more! oothe tilapiawith roastedegetab! i'm actually looking at the wo grilled chicken with portobello wine sauce. at pork chop was great! no more fast food friday's! we're going to go to red lobster. yep. [ male announcer ] come try our new menu and sea food differently and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. salad, sandwiches, and more. jenna: right now the civil war in syria is raging and all fronts. on the battlefield the rebels making new gains or so we hear from amateur video we are watching capturing parts of another large army base in the country's north and increasing their control of an area that is right near turkey. the fi
intelligence officials have a large-scale terror plots in october and into syria, where the reports yesterday of chemical weapons being moved. i'm increasingly worried the terrorists may have programs by turkey, jordan or other countries where persons may fully to escape the bloodshed. it is imperative the interagency security screening process for all refugees be formidable incredible. the purpose of this hearing is to identify any remaining gaps in the security screening process they need to be remedied in to ensure that dhs and the state department had the necessary tools and resources at their disposal to deal to carry out the necessary security checks. it is concerning to me that either of the iraqi refugees arrested last year had worked for any u.s. military diplomatic or nongovernmental organization in iraq. get both receive refugee status based on humanitarian reasons. all this being said, i am glad that the agency security screening and adjudication process for refugees has undergone and continues to undergo a number of enhancements since it was initiated. in particular that's a call
went to syria now they get it from both sides. the state and whenever the rebellion is. we have that in the wake of being expelled. i met an old man who had to flee in 1970 with his wife and said christians did not see the writing on the wall and they should have. the same with egypt. now there is a terrible risk. a huge and christian population. the rich are leaving that they can afford a lawyer or the airplane ticket but what is left are the poor. where will they go on foot? sudan, libya and israel by a are putting up another wall. so they cannot go there either. it is an massive refugee problem waiting to happen in. a pattern repeating itself over and over. i know how to sound the alarm with what is coming with refugees. it will be a nightmare. we just finished with the manuscript. it is not a survey but an analysis of the authorities that persecute christians. there are so many we had to add an additional section in the book to cover it. it is a huge problem. the countries that have been expelled by the most obvious because the same thing happens to the christians now. and t
of a mutual effort to address the threats of hezbollah patrons iran and syria. by simply designating hezbollah as a terrorist organization and stating the obvious, the europeans could deprive hezbollah to access to millions of dollars in european banks and other financial institutions while making an enormous contribution to regional stability, saving hundreds of lives that would otherwise be hezbollah's future victims. again, i strongly support this kelly resolution and i urge all of my colleagues to do the same. with that, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from florida reserves. the gentleman from new york, mr. engel is recognized. mr. engel: i rise in strong support of h.res. 834 and yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for such time as he wishes to consume. mr. engel: thank you. this urges the members of -- the nations of europe and the european union to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization and impose sanctions on it. we know from our experiences with iran that sanctio
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)